What Do Customers Get From You? 2 Minutes to Find Out

If you can’t see the video click here

3 Responses

  1. Thanks Steve – a suggested variation on the “day in the life” exercise. At 58 sec in the video you say “…and where your product fits….”
    working with colleagues, I’ve found it to be very helpful to have teams create 2 “day in the life” sketches focusing on this “where your product fits” area. Diagram 1: “before my product is available” helps highlight the pain or latent need, and “after my product is available” helps highlight the gain and essence of the value proposition. By doing 2 charts I found teams made more progress in this critical area towards product-market fit (VP-CS). Then it is still “guess/hypothesis” that needs customer discovery research to (in)validate or pivot interpretation. I’d be happy to share examples of how I teach this element. It might be good to have an open share space for “tips and tricks” on teaching LLP that different people have found to work for them. Again, I’d be happy to help with this.
    thanks, Paul Cubbon, Sauder School of Business, University of British Columbia (UBC), Canada.

    (Context: I took Steve’s Aug 2012 LLP Educator course and have been busying using this approach since in undergrad and grad credit courses and especially in non-credit programs for STEM researchers. It’s radically changed our approach to supporting venture creation at UBC. Thank-you for that, Steve.)

  2. Thanks Steve – a suggested variation on the “day in the life” exercise. At 58 sec in the video you say “…and where your product fits….”
    working with colleagues, I’ve found it to be very helpful to have teams create 2 “day in the life” sketches focusing on this “where your product fits” area. Diagram 1: “before my product is available” helps highlight the pain or latent need, and “after my product is available” helps highlight the gain and essence of the value proposition. By doing 2 charts I found teams made more progress in this critical area towards product-market fit (VP-CS). Then it is still “guess/hypothesis” that needs customer discovery research to (in)validate or pivot interpretation. I’d be happy to share examples of how I teach this element. It might be good to have an open share space for “tips and tricks” on teaching LLP that different people have found to work for them. Again, I’d be happy to help with this.
    thanks, Paul Cubbon, Sauder School of Business, University of British Columbia (UBC), Canada.

    (Context: I took Steve’s Aug 2012 LLP Educator course and have been busying using this approach since in undergrad and grad credit courses and especially in non-credit programs for STEM researchers. It’s radically changed our approach to supporting venture creation at UBC. Thank-you for that, Steve.)

  3. Great video – you have to understand who your customer is, why they buy, where they find their information and so on or you will waste time and money trying to inform them about you and your products. Great, great advice. But, you say for the business owner to rank each job on behalf of the customer. But, shouldn’t you be having the customer rank the job??

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